Blog Archives

#thiswomancan #youngpeoplecan #artstherapycan

A team of camogie players in 1915, from the National Library of Ireland.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to Week 3 of 2015. Each and every post was interesting and well-written but my personal favourites amongst this week’s  posts were the State of the Art in Medical Education by John McCulloch on the TaysideHealth blog, and #thisgirlcan: a

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in #WeeklyBlogClub summary, communicating, culture, exercise, health, health services, journalism, leadership, public sector, sports, therapy, universities, women

Pizzas are delivered………

On the Dumfries and Galloway Health blog this week we hear from Consultant Midwife Karen King. Karen blogs about promoting women to have a normal birth and the crucial role midwives have in supporting this. The emphasis in Karen’s blogs

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in family, health, health services, patient care, special events, women, working practices

Thinking, Singing, Dancing

Hello lovely bloggers, it’s me Kate Bentham, sitting in the Weekly Blog Club seat for a second week on the trot. How’s your week been then? Have you been enjoying the sun? Had any ice cream? I have, natch. We’ve

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in #WeeklyBlogClub summary, communicating, communities, culture, digital technology, good causes, health, leadership, local government, media, photography, setting goals, social media, visual arts, websites, women, working practices, workplace

Menopause in the workplace

With such a significant proportion of the workforce being women, and being over the age of 50, many are experiencing the hormonal changes of the perimenopause and of the menopause. Heather Currie blogs about the effects of this in the

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in health, women, working practices, workplace

A church app and a martyr to excessive sensibility

Louise Brown comments in passing on an ecclesiastical app on her way to telling us the intriguing and tragic story of “a martyr to excessive sensibility.” I find myself wondering what happened to the villain in the story. A church

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in apps, cultural heritage, history, mental health, storytelling, Third sector, tourism, women

Smoke, journalism, knickers and a mermaid

This was a week in which many saw unusually deep snow for the UK in March, with some being snowed-in and left without power. Despite suggesting that people could use their time spent tucked up indoors in the warmth to

Posted in #WeeklyBlogClub summary, blogging, communicating, communities, conferences, digital technology, family, finance, fine art, health, journalism, leadership, national government, newspapers, public sector, public spaces, sculpture, snow, social media, textile industry, tourism, town and country planning, unconferences, women, working practices

The Folkestone Mermaid

Karen Hart writes about a sculpture, the issues it raises, including what women should look like, what mermaids should look like – and some of the people who connect with this work of art. The Folkestone Mermaid by Karen JK Hart.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in fine art, public spaces, sculpture, society, women
Categories